Title

Use of Music in Reducing Pain During Outpatient Hysteroscopy: Prospective Randomized Trial

Journal

Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research

Year

2021

Abstract

AIM: To evaluate the effect of music in reducing pain during outpatient hysteroscopy under no anesthesia. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial From June 2019 to December 2019 in Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital in Hong Kong. A total of 107 patients were randomized to music group (n =?54) or non-music group (n =?53). Music was played during outpatient hysteroscopy in the music group. Patients in the non-music group had the procedure done in the same setting without music. Primary outcome was the level of pain measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) score before and during the procedure. Secondary outcomes were vital parameters that reflect the level of pain including blood pressure and heart rate. RESULTS: Patients in the music group experienced significantly less pain during outpatient hysteroscopy (VAS score 4.54?±?2.89 vs 5.88?±?2.90; P =?0.02). The anticipated pain level was similar in both groups (VAS score 5.59?±?2.27 vs 6.11?±?2.43; P =?0.27). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in all the vital parameters. CONCLUSION: Listening to music during outpatient hysteroscopy under no anesthesia significantly reduces pain in a well-matched Chinese population. Music is easy to provide with low-cost equipment and manpower. We recommend the routine use of music during outpatient hysteroscopy to improve patient care.

Music and Health Institute Terms

Blood Pressure; Heart Rate; Hospital Setting; Invasive Medical Procedures; Music Listening; Music Medicine; Pain; Pain Management and Control; Recorded Music Listening; Self-Report Measures; Visual Analog Scale (VAS); Vital Signs

Indexed Terms

Hong Kong; Hysteroscopy; Outpatients; Pain; Pain Measurement; Pregnancy; Prospective Studies; gynecology; hysteroscopy; visual analog pain scale

Study Type

Quantitative Methods; Randomized Controlled Trial

PubMed ID

33336450

Document Type

Article

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