Title

Music Therapy to Reduce Agitation in Dementia

Authors

J. Craig

Journal

Nursing Times

Year

2014

Volume

110

Issue

32-33

First Page

12

Last Page

5

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Music therapy is a non-pharmacological intervention that aims to increase emotional wellbeing through cognitive stimulation and social interaction. AIM AND METHOD: I aimed to investigate the efficacy of group music therapy to reduce agitation in people with dementia. To this end, I carried out a systematic review of the literature. RESULTS: Eight articles show that music therapy is feasible for use with people with all stages of dementia. The best results involved using familiar music and a qualified group music therapist, with the optimum frequency of intervention being two to three times a week for 30-50 minutes. Control interventions such as reading and recreational activities also reduced agitation. CONCLUSION: Music therapy should be implemented by qualified music therapists in care homes and day care units. Further research should be conducted to ascertain the most suitable music types to be used in therapy sessions.

Music and Health Institute Terms

Anxiety; Music Listening; Music Medicine; Music Therapy; Neurocognitive Disorders; Receptive Music Methods; Recorded Music Listening; Wellness and Well-Being

Indexed Terms

Dementia; Psychomotor Agitation; Psychotherapy, Group; United Kingdom

Study Type

Quantitative Methods; Systematic Review

Disciplines

Nursing

PubMed ID

25188964

Document Type

Article

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