Preterm Infants Exhibited Less Pain During a Heel Stick When They Were Played the Same Music Their Mothers Listened to During Pregnancy

Lina Kurdahi Badr
Taline Demerjian
Tania Daaboul
Hanan Abbas
Mirvat Hasan Zeineddine
Lama Charafeddine

Abstract

Aim: Playing music during painful procedures has shown inconsistent benefits for preterm infants. This study observed preterm infants during a heel stick procedure to assess whether listening to the music their mothers listened to during pregnancy had any impact on their pain and physiological and behavioural parameters. Methods: We randomly exposed 42 preterm infants, with a mean gestational age of 31.8 ± 2.79 weeks, to the music their mothers listened to during pregnancy, recorded lullabies and no music, before, during and after a heel stick. Pain responses were measured using the Neonatal Pain, Agitation and Sedation Scale (N-PASS), and physiological and behavioural responses were recorded by a nurse blinded to the intervention. Results: N-PASS pain scores were lowest during mothers’ music, with a mean of 1.40 (± 1.28), compared to 2.33 (± 1.64) for no music and 1.62 (± 2.27) for the lullabies [F(3/121) = 4.86, p = 0.009]. Physiological parameters were not significantly different between the conditions. During the mothers’ music, infants spent more time in a quiet alert state, with a significant decrease in their respiratory rates. Conclusion: The music mothers listened to during pregnancy was more beneficial for preterm infants, as it decreased pain and improved behavioural states during a heel stick. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)